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Tax Alerts

While April 15 (April 17 this year) is the main tax deadline on most individual taxpayers’ minds, there are others through the rest of the year that you also need to be aware of. To help you make sure you don’t miss any important 2018 deadlines, here’s a look at when some key tax-related forms, payments and other actions are due. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you.


The federal income tax filing deadline is slightly later than usual this year — April 17 — but it’s now nearly upon us. So, if you haven’t filed your individual return yet, you may be thinking about an extension. Or you may just be concerned about meeting the deadline in the eyes of the IRS. Whatever you do, don’t get tripped up by one of these potential pitfalls.


Home ownership is a key element of the American dream for many, and the U.S. tax code includes many tax breaks that help support this dream. If you own a home, you may be eligible for several valuable breaks when you file your 2017 return. But under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, your home-related breaks may not be as valuable when you file your 2018 return next year.


Making your financial statements gleam with success in the eyes of lenders or other stakeholders may require cutting back on poor-selling, unprofitable inventory or services.


A $100 donation may not provide a $100 charitable deduction. What you give and how the charity uses the gift are just two of the factors that may also affect your deduction. Here’s what you need to know.


Considering a home mortgage restructuring or foreclosure? You may be surprised to learn that such debt relief can increase your taxable income. But if you act soon, you may be eligible for a tax break.


Productivity and, indeed, profitability are both tied to highly engaged employees. When looking to promote employee engagement, lessons lie in Maslow’s “hierarchy of needs.”


Being classified as a trader rather than an investor has certain tax advantages if you make short-term investments. But qualifying as a trader isn’t easy.


Would you drive a car without a functional dashboard? Perhaps once a month someone could tell you how fast you were going and how much fuel you had left. Sound good? Probably not. Yet this is how many business owners run their companies.


If you recently redeemed frequent flyer miles to treat the family to a fun summer vacation or to take your spouse on a romantic getaway, you might assume that there are no tax implications involved. And you’re probably right — but there is a chance your miles could be taxable.


Succession planning raises some tough questions. When should you hand over the reins? And how and when should you reveal your successor’s identity to employees? We offer some helpful advice.


If you’ve paid investment advisory fees, retained certain legal services or not been reimbursed for employee business expenses, you might benefit from “bunching” miscellaneous deductions into 2016.


It’s the goal of many Americans to pass wealth to the next generation. To maximize what goes to your loved ones vs. Uncle Sam, you need to carefully plan your gifts.


Today’s companies can be undermined by many things. Savvy leaders must lay a solid foundation and continue to elevate their success. Here are the four pillars on which you should build your business.


You want employees to show up for work. But a worker who’s ill or distracted can actually inhibit productivity — otherwise known as “presenteeism.” Learn more about this common problem.


If you win a bet, do you have to report the income? Are wagering losses deductible? If you’ve gambled this year and can’t answer these questions, here’s what you need to know.


Nearly every business is vulnerable to fraud. One common scheme is padding expense account reports. This threat could derail your profitability. Here’s how to fight back.


Just hours before government funding was set to expire, President Trump on March 23 signed the bipartisan Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018, averting a government shutdown. The $1.3 trillion fiscal year 2018 omnibus spending package, which provides funding for the government and federal agencies through September 30, contains several tax provisions and increased IRS funding.


The American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) has renewed its call for immediate guidance on new Code Sec. 199A. The AICPA highlighted questions about qualified business income (QBI) of pass-through income under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act ( P.L. 115-97). "Taxpayers and practitioners need clarity regarding QBI in order to comply with their 2018 tax obligations," the AICPA said in a February 21 letter to the Service.


A top House tax writer has confirmed that House Republicans and the Trump administration are working on a second phase of tax reform this year. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Tex., said in an interview that the Trump administration and House Republicans "think more can be done."


The House Ways and Means Tax Policy Subcommittee held a March 14 hearing in which lawmakers and stakeholders examined the future of various temporary tax extenders post-tax reform. Over 30 tax breaks, which included energy and fuel credits, among others, were retroactively extended for the 2017 tax year in the Bipartisan Budget Act ( P.L. 115-123) enacted in February.


The IRS has released Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) to address a taxpayer’s filing obligations and payment requirements with respect to the Code Sec. 965 transition tax, enacted as part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Creation Act ( P.L. 115-97). The instructions in the FAQs are for filing 2017 returns with an amount of Code Sec. 965 tax. Failure to follow the FAQs could result in difficulties in processing the returns. Taxpayers who are required to file electronically are asked to wait until April 2, 2018, to file returns so that the IRS can make system changes.


The U.S. Supreme Court reversed an individual’s conviction for obstructing tax law administration. The government failed to show that the individual knew that a "proceeding" was pending when he engaged in the obstructive conduct.


Health flexible spending arrangements (health FSAs) are popular savings vehicles for medical expenses, but their use has been held back by a strict use-or-lose rule. The IRS recently announced a significant change to encourage more employers to offer health FSAs and boost enrollment. At the plan sponsor's option, employees participating in health FSAs will be able to carry over, instead of forfeiting, up to $500 of unused funds remaining at year-end.


The IRS has made several changes to its examination (aka, "audit") functions that are designed to expedite the process and relieve some burden on business taxpayers. These include the expansion of the Fast Track Settlement (FTS) program for small business, self-employed (SB/SE) taxpayers and a new process for issuing information document requests (IDRs) in large case audits.





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