Cummings, Lamont & McNamee, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
Home
About CLM
Our Team
Client Services
Career Opportunities
Info Center
News
Financial Tools
Links
Contact Us
News
 
Tax Alerts

With the April 17 individual income tax filing deadline behind you (or with your 2017 tax return on the back burner if you filed for an extension), you may be hoping to not think about taxes for the next several months. But for maximum tax savings, now is the time to start tax planning for 2018. It’s especially critical to get an early start this year because the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) has substantially changed the tax environment.


While April 15 (April 17 this year) is the main tax deadline on most individual taxpayers’ minds, there are others through the rest of the year that you also need to be aware of. To help you make sure you don’t miss any important 2018 deadlines, here’s a look at when some key tax-related forms, payments and other actions are due. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you.


The federal income tax filing deadline is slightly later than usual this year — April 17 — but it’s now nearly upon us. So, if you haven’t filed your individual return yet, you may be thinking about an extension. Or you may just be concerned about meeting the deadline in the eyes of the IRS. Whatever you do, don’t get tripped up by one of these potential pitfalls.


Home ownership is a key element of the American dream for many, and the U.S. tax code includes many tax breaks that help support this dream. If you own a home, you may be eligible for several valuable breaks when you file your 2017 return. But under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, your home-related breaks may not be as valuable when you file your 2018 return next year.


Making your financial statements gleam with success in the eyes of lenders or other stakeholders may require cutting back on poor-selling, unprofitable inventory or services.


A $100 donation may not provide a $100 charitable deduction. What you give and how the charity uses the gift are just two of the factors that may also affect your deduction. Here’s what you need to know.


Considering a home mortgage restructuring or foreclosure? You may be surprised to learn that such debt relief can increase your taxable income. But if you act soon, you may be eligible for a tax break.


Productivity and, indeed, profitability are both tied to highly engaged employees. When looking to promote employee engagement, lessons lie in Maslow’s “hierarchy of needs.”


Being classified as a trader rather than an investor has certain tax advantages if you make short-term investments. But qualifying as a trader isn’t easy.


Would you drive a car without a functional dashboard? Perhaps once a month someone could tell you how fast you were going and how much fuel you had left. Sound good? Probably not. Yet this is how many business owners run their companies.


If you recently redeemed frequent flyer miles to treat the family to a fun summer vacation or to take your spouse on a romantic getaway, you might assume that there are no tax implications involved. And you’re probably right — but there is a chance your miles could be taxable.


Succession planning raises some tough questions. When should you hand over the reins? And how and when should you reveal your successor’s identity to employees? We offer some helpful advice.


If you’ve paid investment advisory fees, retained certain legal services or not been reimbursed for employee business expenses, you might benefit from “bunching” miscellaneous deductions into 2016.


It’s the goal of many Americans to pass wealth to the next generation. To maximize what goes to your loved ones vs. Uncle Sam, you need to carefully plan your gifts.


Today’s companies can be undermined by many things. Savvy leaders must lay a solid foundation and continue to elevate their success. Here are the four pillars on which you should build your business.


You want employees to show up for work. But a worker who’s ill or distracted can actually inhibit productivity — otherwise known as “presenteeism.” Learn more about this common problem.


If you win a bet, do you have to report the income? Are wagering losses deductible? If you’ve gambled this year and can’t answer these questions, here’s what you need to know.


Nearly every business is vulnerable to fraud. One common scheme is padding expense account reports. This threat could derail your profitability. Here’s how to fight back.


The Senate Finance Committee (SFC) advanced President Donald Trump’s nomination of Charles Rettig for IRS Commissioner. The SFC approved the nomination on July 19 by a 14-to-13 party line vote.


President Donald Trump and House GOP tax writers discussed "Tax Cuts 2.0" in a July 17 meeting at the White House. The next round of tax cuts will focus primarily on the individual side of the tax code, both Trump and House Ways and Means Chair Kevin Brady, R-Tex., reiterated to reporters at the White House before the meeting.


House Republicans and the Trump Administration are working together to craft a tax cut "2.0"outline, the House’s top tax writer has said. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Tex., told reporters during the week that House tax writers and the White House are currently working to finalize the "framework."


The Senate Finance Committee’s (SFC) leading Democrat has released a report critiquing Republicans’ 2017 overhaul of the tax code. The report, focusing primarily on international tax reform, was released by SFC ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., on July 18.


Homeowners will be hurt financially by last year’s tax reform, according to a new House Democratic staff report. The report alleges that real estate developers will primarily benefit from the new tax law at the expense of homeowners.


The IRS has issued final regulations that target tax-motivated inversion transactions and certain post-inversion tax avoidance transactions. The final regulations retain the thresholds and substantiation requirements of the 2016 final, temporary and proposed regulations (the 2016 regulations), but make limited changes to the 2016 regulations to improve clarity and reduce unnecessary complexity and burdens on taxpayers. These changes also ensure that the final regulations do not impact cross-border transactions that are economically beneficial and not tax-motivated.


The Fifth Circuit vacated a tax preparer’s conviction for obstructing tax administration. The conviction was no longer valid in light of C.J. Marinello, SCt., 2018-1 ustc ¶50,192.


National Taxpayer Advocate Nina E. Olson has released her mid-year report to Congress. The report contains a review of the 2018 filing season, and identifies the priority issues the Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS) will address during the upcoming fiscal year. It also includes the IRS’s responses to each of the 100 administrative recommendations made in the 2017 Annual Report to Congress.


Health flexible spending arrangements (health FSAs) are popular savings vehicles for medical expenses, but their use has been held back by a strict use-or-lose rule. The IRS recently announced a significant change to encourage more employers to offer health FSAs and boost enrollment. At the plan sponsor's option, employees participating in health FSAs will be able to carry over, instead of forfeiting, up to $500 of unused funds remaining at year-end.


The IRS has made several changes to its examination (aka, "audit") functions that are designed to expedite the process and relieve some burden on business taxpayers. These include the expansion of the Fast Track Settlement (FTS) program for small business, self-employed (SB/SE) taxpayers and a new process for issuing information document requests (IDRs) in large case audits.





HomeAbout CLMOur TeamClient ServicesCareer OpportunitiesInfo CenterNewsFinancial ToolsLinksContact Us